Three Girls

It’s not easy being a teenage girl.  In fact, it’s pretty horrible. Yet when I think of when I was a teenage girl to teenage girls now, it seems a bit easier.  But then again…

Life clearly has changed.  Gone are the days of teenagers hanging around street corners.  Social media and iPhone have put a stop to that. Yet despite the added pressure on appearance that such media demands, teenagers seem more confident about themselves.  They won’t be in the background.  They are proud of who they are and their position in society.

Role models play a big part in this.  In my day, it was all about the boy bands.  Now the boy bands have been relegated and replaced by strong women like Taylor Swift, Katy Perry and Ariana Grande.  Women who ooze confidence and tell their fans to be exactly who they want to be.

This confidence can be misread as essentially teenagers are still children.  What is awful is when adults abuse this confidence and manipulate it to suit their own sometimes sickening ends.  This is clearly seen in Three Girls.  Authorities failed to realise that the girls were children.  No one was willing to step up and take responsibility in making the abusers accountable for their actions.  In one chilling scene, Maxine Peake who plays sexual health worker Sara Rowbotham, confronts a social worker who states that the girls had made a choice to become prostitutes.

“You can’t be a child prostitute! There’s no such thing!”

The social worker looks bemused.  The fact they are children doesn’t seem to register.  Of course, the abusers believe they are not to blame.  In court, one of them decries the girls for the clothes they wear and their parents for giving them the freedom to live their lives.  For him, such girls should be locked away until they are ready for marriage.

Teenage girls were at the heart of the awful events in Manchester.  Any concert would have been terrible but to target such a young and vulnerable group is sickening.  Mothers and daughters are vowing not to go to such venues.  These sick individuals have manipulated our sense of freedom so now we want to lock ourselves away.  We need to throw open this oppression, resist the manipulation and be free.

I had to do my fair amount of manipulation this week.  It was scan result time and I wasn’t looking forward to it.  I dialled the extension my oncologist had given me.  It was wrong.  Good start.  Then I noticed I couldn’t make my next oncology appointment in August.  Maybe if I changed the appointment, they might give me the right extension number?  I dialled and predicted a long, long wait.  It connected straight away to a voice recording saying that this number was for changing appointments only.  All hell would break loose should you wish to do otherwise.  I took a deep breath.  I was connected to a rather jolly chap who changed my appointment no probs.  Right the big one. Could I have the extension number please?

“No problem.  I’ll just connect you.”

Five seconds later I was speaking to my oncologist’s secretary who confirmed that my scan results were good.  The tumour was still the same size so the treatment was still working.  So, in a week of such darkness there was a chink of light.